Altered Monocyte and Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule Expression Is Linked to Vascular Inflammation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have increased risk for vascular thrombosis, potentially driven by interactions between activated leukocytes and the endothelium.

Methods.

Monocyte subsets (CD14+CD16−, CD14+CD16+, CD14DimCD16+) from HIV negative (HIV−) and antiretroviral therapy-treated HIV positive (HIV+) participants (N = 19 and 49) were analyzed by flow cytometry for adhesion molecule expression (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1], macrophage-1 antigen [Mac-1], CD11c/CD18, very late antigen [VLA]-4) and the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1); these receptors recognize ligands (intercellular adhesion molecules [ICAMs], vascular cell adhesion molecule [VCAM]-1, fractalkine) on activated endothelial cells (ECs) and promote vascular migration. Plasma markers of monocyte (soluble [s]CD14, sCD163) and EC (VCAM-1, ICAM-1,2, fractalkine) activation and systemic (tumor necrosis factor receptor [TNFR-I], TNFR-II) and vascular (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 [Lp-PLA2]) inflammation were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results.

Proportions of CD16+ monocyte subsets were increased in HIV+ participants. Among all monocyte subsets, levels of LFA-1 were increased and CX3CR1 levels were decreased in HIV+ participants (P < .01). Levels of sCD163, sCD14, fractalkine, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, TNFR-II, and Lp-PLA2 were also increased in HIV+ participants (P < .05), and levels of sCD14, TNFR-I, and TNFR-II were directly related to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels in HIV+ participants. Expression of CX3CR1 on monocyte subsets was inversely related to plasma Lp-PLA2 (P < .05 for all).

Conclusions.

Increased proportions of CD16+ monocytes, cells with altered adhesion molecule expression, combined with elevated levels of their ligands, may promote vascular inflammation in HIV infection.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles