The natural killer cell response and tumor debulking are associated with prolonged survival in recurrent glioblastoma patients receiving dendritic cells loaded with autologous tumor lysates

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Recurrent glioblastomas (GBs) are highly aggressive tumors associated with a 6-8 mo survival rate. In this study, we evaluated the possible benefits of an immunotherapeutic strategy based on mature dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with autologous tumor-cell lysates in 15 patients affected by recurrent GB. The median progression-free survival (PFS) of this patient cohort was 4.4 mo, and the median overall survival (OS) was 8.0 mo. Patients with small tumors at the time of the first vaccination (< 20 cm3; n = 8) had significantly longer PFS and OS than the other patients (6.0 vs. 3.0 mo, p = 0.01; and 16.5 vs. 7.0 mo, p = 0.003, respectively). CD8+ T cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells and other immune parameters, such as the levels of transforming growth factor β, vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-12 and interferon γ (IFNγ), were measured in the peripheral blood and serum of patients before and after immunization, which enabled us to obtain a vaccination/baseline ratio (V/B ratio). An increased V/B ratio for NK cells, but not CD8+ T cells, was significantly associated with prolonged PFS and OS. Patients exhibiting NK-cell responses were characterized by high levels of circulating IFNγ and E4BP4, an NK-cell transcription factor. Furthermore, the NK cell V/B ratio was inversely correlated with the TGFβ2 and VEGF V/B ratios. These results suggest that tumor-loaded DCs may increase the survival rate of patients with recurrent GB after effective tumor debulking, and emphasize the role of the NK-cell response in this therapeutic setting.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles