Prostaglandin Eyedrops Are Associated With Decreased Thicknesses of Eyelid Dermis and Orbicularis Oculi Muscle: Ultrasonographic Findings

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose:

To investigate the effect of prostaglandin analog eyedrops on the periorbital soft tissue using high-resolution ultrasonography.

Methods:

In this cross-sectional study, the authors included patients with bilateral glaucoma on unilateral prostaglandin therapy for the past 12 or more contiguous months. High-resolution ultrasonography was performed bilaterally on the upper and lower eyelids of each subject to measure thicknesses of dermis, orbicularis oculi muscle, and skin to arcus marginalis distance. Comparisons were made between eyes on prostaglandin eyedrops versus those not on prostaglandin analogs.

Results:

Twenty patients (16 females, 4 males) with a mean age of 67.2 ± 6.4 years were recruited. The mean duration of prostaglandin analog therapy was 5.4 ± 3.9 years. The authors found that eyes on prostaglandin analog therapy had statistically significantly reduced thicknesses of dermis, orbicularis oculi muscle, and skin to arcus marginalis distance in the upper and lower eyelids compared with the fellow eyes (p < 0.05 for all). In univariate regression analysis, the amount of changes in thicknesses of dermis, orbicularis oculi muscle, and skin to arcus marginalis distance among eyes on prostaglandin analog therapy and the fellow eyes was not statistically significantly associated with different variables including age, gender, years of being on prostaglandin analog therapy, type of prostaglandin analog, history of glaucoma and/or cataract surgeries, intraocular pressure, and number of glaucoma medications.

Conclusions:

The findings indicate that eyes on prostaglandin analog therapy have reduced thicknesses of dermis, orbicularis oculi muscle, and skin to arcus marginalis distance compared with the fellow eyes.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles