Double Dislocation of Interphalangeal Joints Accompanied with Contralateral Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report

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Abstract

Dislocation of any joint is an orthopaedic emergency and needs immediate attention by the attending physician. A delay in reducing a dislocated joint can lead to disastrous complications both immediately as well as in the long run. Although anterior dislocation of a shoulder joint is by far the commonest dislocation encountered by any emergency care physician, other joints may also get dislocated. In certain cases two joints may get dislocated simultaneously. Such dislocation is known as a double dislocation. Double dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint and the distal interphalangeal joint in the same finger is a rare injury. High impact loading at the fingertip is the primary cause in most cases and it is often associated with younger individuals playing contact sports. The right little finger is the digit commonly involved and this injury is evident in football players more often than not. Although closed reduction is a preferred treatment, it may not be always successful. Time of presentation, tendon interposition, associated swelling and co-existent phalangeal fractures are certain key impediments to a successful closed reduction manoeuvre. In patients with an open injury, a thorough wash out and appropriate antibiotic cover is mandatory. We report a rare case of double dislocation of the interphalangeal joints accompanied with contralateral shoulder dislocation in an elderly man sustained after a fall which was treated successfully with closed reduction and early mobilization.

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