Long-term complications of septal dermoplasty in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Septal dermoplasty has been recommended as the treatment of choice for life-threatening epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. This study evaluates the complications of septal dermoplasty in the management of transfusion-dependent epistaxis.

STUDY DESIGN

Consecutive retrospective study.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Between 1994 and 2006, septal dermoplasty was performed on 106 consecutive patients with transfusion dependent epistaxis. Of 103 potential patients, 37 either died or were lost to follow-up, which left 66 patients for study. Data on complications and quality of life were collected on 50 (76%) of 66 patients (mean follow-up, 3.75 years) via phone interview.

RESULTS

Seventy-eight percent experienced nasal odor; 72% had nasal crusting; 58% had decreased sense of smell; 30% noted worsened sinus infection; 88% could breathe through their nose; 86% stated improved quality of life.

CONCLUSION

Septal dermoplasty remains an effective way of treating transfusion dependent epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and subjectively improves their quality of life.

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