Longitudinal pattern of multiplexed immunoglobulin E sensitization from prenatal stage to the first year of life

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Abstract

Background

The longitudinal pattern of allergen-specific IgE levels from the prenatal stage to early life has remained largely unexplored.

Methods

One-hundred and three mother–infant pairs, which were part of an ongoing population-based prospective birth cohort study of early childhood allergic diseases in Tainan, Taiwan, were included in this study. We examined the relationship of 20 allergen-specific IgE levels with blood samples of mothers, cord blood, and infants at 12 months of age using Spearman rank correlation, Kenal τ and McNemar test, respectively.

Results

Certain degree of IgE sensitization against most 20 examined specific allergens was observed in blood samples of mothers, cord blood, and infants at 12 months of age. When we further examined the association between allergy-related risk factors and atopy in infants at the first year of life, we found positive association between colic pain and atopy in infants at 12 months of age [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 3.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13–10.96; p = 0.03], and borderline significance between wheezing and atopy in infants at 12 months of age (AOR = 4.58; 95% CI: 0.89–23.50; p = 0.07).

Conclusion

The findings from this study suggest that influence of maternal allergen-specific IgE levels on infant immune response might occur at birth and then wane in infants at 12 months of age. Positive association of colic pain and wheezing with atopy in infants at 12 months of age provides supportive evidence for the ‘Allergy March' theory of allergy development in an Asian birth cohort.

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