CONTEXTUAL INTERFERENCE EFFECT ON ACQUISITION AND RETENTION OF PISTOL-SHOOTING SKILLS1,2

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Summary

The effects of contextual interference on learning pistol-shooting skills in a natural training environment were examined. The shooting skills consisted of three “stages” with different requirements for the skill variations commonly used in the field. 12 participants were randomly assigned into one of two practice conditions, blocked vs serial. Following a 20-min. safety and skill instructional session, Blocked group practiced 10 trials in a row at each stage, while Serial group performed 5 trials in a row for each of the three stages and then repeated the cycle. Both groups completed a total of 30 practice trials over the three stages. A 10-min. rest interval was provided prior to a retention test which included 9 trials (3 trials at each stage in a blocked format). Results based on the data of Stage III, the most complex skill among the three stages, showed a pattern consistent with previous findings that practicing in the serial schedule depressed performance during initial training but maintained the performance better at retention, relative to the blocked practice.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles