THE USE OF MOUSE AND ONE- AND TWO-FINGER INPUT METHODS FOR SEARCHING A LARGE, HORIZONTAL DISPLAY1,2


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Abstract

Summary.A horizontal, table-sized computer display was used to examine one- and two-finger search performances. 31 college students participated in a basic computer operation and target landmark search task. The mean completion times of the target landmark search task were analyzed by a repeated-measures analysis of variance with the following factors: input device, environmental familiarity, and cue. Compared to the mouse, directly touching the computer display with one finger was inefficient when the task required more precise human-computer interactions, such as selecting small objects, or complicated tasks such as searching for targets in a computerized geographic application. However, directly touching the computer display with two fingers, one finger of each hand, appears efficient in complicated tasks. Additionally, familiar and cued environments can aid in the target landmark search task especially when searching within the cued conditions. However, the unfavorable effect of using a one-finger touch technique in searching may eliminate such cue effects.

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