Factors with independent influence on the ‘timed up and go’ test in patients with hip fracture


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Abstract

Background and PurposeData on performance times for the ‘timed up and go’ (TUG) test with analyses of factors, that eventually could affect the result in patients with hip fracture, have not been published to date. The aims of the present study, therefore, were to assess normative reference values of TUG performances and determine the influence of individual and clinical factors on TUG-test scores in patients with hip fracture.MethodIn this prospective, descriptive study, a total of 196 consecutive patients over the age of 60, and able to perform the TUG when discharged directly to their own homes from a specialized orthopaedic hip fracture unit, were evaluated. The association between TUG scores and categorical variables were examined, and linear regression was used to investigate the factors influencing performance times.ResultsUnivariate analysis showed significant differences between all categorical variables, except gender, but multivariate linear regression analyses showed that only a high pre-fracture function level, evaluated by the New Mobility Score (B = −11), was independently associated with having a good TUG score, while older age (B = 0.49), having an intertrochanteric fracture (B = 7), performing TUG with a walker (B = 15), and performing TUG in the later postoperative period (B = 0.39) were independently associated with having a poorer TUG score.ConclusionsThese preliminary normative reference values of TUG performances in patients with hip fracture can be used as references, to which individuals can expect to perform. Multivariate testing suggests that clinicians should use age, pre-fracture function, fracture type and walking-aid specific data when interpreting the TUG test results. Physiotherapists should be aware of this if TUG scores are to be used predictively or as an outcome measure in patients with hip fracture, especially in research.

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