Pigment pattern formation in the : parallel increase of pteridine biosynthesis and pigmentation of melanin and ommochromesquail: parallel increase of pteridine biosynthesis and pigmentation of melanin and ommochromes mutant of the silkworm, : parallel increase of pteridine biosynthesis and pigmentation of melanin and ommochromesBombyx mori: parallel increase of pteridine biosynthesis and pigmentation of melanin and ommochromes

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Summary

The larval pigment pattern in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is formed by melanin, ommochromes and pteridines. During development all these pigments are synthesized autonomously, and possibly also with mutual interaction between them, to yield unique pigment patterns. In order to find the key trigger for such pigment pattern formation, developmental changes in pteridine biosynthesis were studied using the quail mutant (q/q), which has darker larval marks formed by melanin and an abundance of ommochromes in the integument. In the current study, emphasis has been placed on the analysis of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTP-CH I), which is a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of pteridines, during the development of the silkworm. Results of Northern blotting showed that in the quail mutant strong signals of GTP-CH I mRNA appeared around each period of ecdysis, while no such signals appeared in the background strain (+q/q) used. Also, both GTP-CH I activities and pteridine content were higher in the quail mutant compared with the background strain. These results strongly suggest that pteridine biosynthesis is closely linked to the formation of melanin and ommochromes. It is also suggested here that in the silkworm a recessive gene (q) may be involved in the regulation of its pigment pattern formation.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles