Denial in lung cancer patients: a longitudinal study

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

Although denial in cancer patients is well known clinically, few studies investigating the prevalence of denial over time have been conducted.

Background:

The objectives of this study are to investigate the level of denial in lung cancer patients over time and the impact of socio-demographic and illness-related variables on denial in these patients.

Methods:

The level of denial was measured in 195 consecutive newly diagnosed lung cancer patients, using the Denial of Cancer Interview. Four assessments were conducted in eight months.

Methods:

Socio-demographic data were collected during the interviews. Medical data were provided by the chest physicians.

Results:

Most patients (86.6%) displayed a low or moderate level of denial at baseline. A small number (3%) showed a high level of denial. The mean level of denial was lowest at baseline and increased over time.

Results:

Male lung cancer patients exhibited more denial than did female ones, and younger patients showed less denial than did the elderly. Shortly after diagnosis, patients with a lower level of education denied stronger than higher educated patients, and during the course of illness, both groups showed the same level of denial.

Conclusion:

A certain level of denial has to be considered a normal phenomenon in lung cancer patients, part of the illness process that they undergo.

Conclusion:

Whether the level of denial is related to adaptive or maladaptive coping remains to be investigated.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles