Effect of dietary supplementation withMoringa oleiferaleaf on performance, meat quality, and oxidative stability of meat in broilers

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with Moringa oleifera leaf (MOL) on performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality, and oxidative stability of breast muscle in broilers. A total of 720 1-d-old male Arbor Acres birds were randomly divided into 6 dietary groups, which were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 15% MOL, respectively. Each group had 6 replicates of 20 birds each. The feeding trial lasted for 42 d. The results showed dietary MOL supplementation linearly and quadratically decreased body weight and average daily gain (P < 0.01), and increased feed conversion ratio (P < 0.001). Abdominal fat decreased linearly and quadratically in response to the supplementation of MOL in diets, both on d 21 and 42 (P < 0.001). In breast muscle, dietary supplementation with MOL quadratically increased the contents of C18:2, C18:3n-3, C20:4, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA (P < 0.01), and decreased thrombogenic index (TI; P = 0.019). Dietary inclusion of MOL improved meat color, evidenced by quadratically reduced b* (yellowness) values (45 min postmortem, P = 0.001; 24 h postmortem, P = 0.018) and increased a* (redness) values (24 h postmortem, P < 0.001). Besides, diets supplemented with MOL quadratically decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in breast muscle during storage (P < 0.001). Plasma total anti-oxidative capacity, total superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities increased quadratically (P < 0.01), whereas MDA decreased quadratically (P < 0.001), in response to dietary MOL supplementation. In summary, MOL could be used as a feed ingredient for broilers to improve PUFA contents, oxidative stability, color of breast muscle, and abdominal fat without adverse effects on growth performance, with an inclusion of 1.56% in the diets.

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