Breast Reconstruction Using the Entire Transverse Abdominal Adipocutaneous Flap Based on Unilateral Superficial or Deep Inferior Epigastric Vessels

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Abstract

Background:

Among various alternatives for autologous breast reconstruction, the superficial inferior epigastric artery abdominal flap provides the least donor-site morbidity, as dissection of the rectus abdominis sheath and muscle is not required. However, because of inconsistencies in the existence and size of the superficial inferior epigastric artery, its use is limited. In addition, whether the perfusion from the superficial system is adequate across the midline is still a question to be answered.

Methods:

Over a period of 16 months, the authors performed a total of 44 breast reconstructions using either the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap (n = 30) or the superficial inferior epigastric artery flap (n = 14). In all cases, the superficial inferior epigastric artery system was explored first and used as the pedicle if the diameter of the available vessels was larger than 1 mm. If the vessels were unavailable or the diameters were smaller than 1 mm, the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein were used as the pedicle. The diameter of the superficial inferior epigastric artery ranged between 0.8 and 3.0 mm, and the mean pedicle length was 6 cm. The superficial inferior epigastric artery was not available in 21 cases (48 percent), and in nine cases (20 percent) the diameter was smaller than 1 mm. In six cases where the superficial inferior epigastric artery was judged to be appropriate, laser Doppler study was performed perioperatively to assess the perfusion of each zone (I through IV) from the deep and superficial systems consecutively. In all cases, the superficial and deep systems ipsilateral to the defect were dissected. During inset, zone IV was not discarded routinely, and 92.3 percent and 86.7 percent of the harvested superficial inferior epigastric artery flap and deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, respectively, were used.

Results:

The flap survival rates were 93 and 100 percent in the superficial inferior epigastric artery and deep inferior epigastric artery perforator groups, respectively. Adequate perfusion of all zones from the superficial system was documented by laser Doppler flowmetry, and the perfusion rates were comparable to the deep system.

Conclusions:

The entire abdominal adipocutaneous flap based on the unilateral superficial inferior epigastric artery is as reliable as one based on the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. As a result, initially, the superficial inferior epigastric artery flap should be explored, as it provides less donor-site morbidity. A sizable superficial artery and vein is sufficiently safe for microsurgical transfer, similar to the deep inferior epigastric system.

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