Prognosis of fetuses with ventriculomegaly: An observational retrospective study


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Abstract

ObjectiveTo investigate the prognosis of fetuses with ventriculomegaly (VM).MethodsClinical data were collected from 234 cases of fetal VM diagnosed by ultrasound between March 2010 and July 2016. VM progression was monitored, and karyotyping and infection screening performed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed where increasing ventricular diameter was noted. Neonatal behavioral neurological assessment (NBNA) was carried out after birth, and Bayley Scales of Infant Development assessment at 6 months.ResultsThe in utero outcomes of Group A were better than Group B in 173 pregnancies. Isolated VM (IVM) was associated with better prognosis than nonisolated VM (NIVM); the regression rates were 74.6% (59/79) and 52.1% (49/94), respectively (χ2 = 10.222, .006). The NBNA scores were significantly higher in Group A than Group B (χ2 = 4.231, .004), but not significantly different between IVM and NIVM. The composition ratios of both the psychomotor and mental developmental index (PDI and MDI) scores were not significantly different between Groups A and B (Z = 1.869, .062 and Z = 0.826, .409, respectively). Significant differences in in utero outcomes were observed between IVM and NIVM cases in Groups A and B.ConclusionsFetal VM prognosis is affected by the width of ventricle, chromosome abnormalities, coexisted abnormalities, and in utero progression.What is already known about this topic?Fetal ventriculomegaly (VM) is a relatively common fetal anomaly. The survival rate of fetuses with mild VM is 93%, decreasing to 84% in the case of moderate or severe VM. However, if other malformations are present, the survival rate drops to 60%. The risk of postnatal neurodevelopmental retardation in the case of mild or moderate IVM is about 7.9%, 2% to 3% higher than that of normal childrenWhat does this study add?Fetal VM prognosis is affected by the width of ventricle, chromosome abnormalities, coexisted abnormalities, and in utero progression.

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