Impact of hypertension on early outcomes and long-term survival of patients undergoing aortic repair with Stanford A dissection

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Abstract

Introduction:

Stanford A acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening emergency, typically occurring in hypertensive patients, requiring immediate surgical repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate early outcomes and long-term survival of hypertensive patients in comparison to normotensive patients suffering from Stanford A AAD.

Methods:

In our center, 240 patients with Stanford A AAD underwent aortic surgical repair from January 2006 to April 2015. After statistical and logistic regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival estimation was performed, with up to 9-year follow-up.

Results:

The proportion of hypertensive patients suffering from Stanford A AAD was 75.4% (n=181). There were only few statistically significant differences in terms of basic demographics, comorbidities, preoperative baseline and clinical characteristics of hypertensive patients in comparison to normotensive patients. Hypertensive patients were significantly older (p=0.008), more frequently received hemi-arch repair (p=0.028) and selective brain perfusion (p=0.001).

Results:

Our study showed similar statistical results in terms of 30-day mortality (p=0.196), long-term overall cumulative survival of patients (Log-Rank p=0.506) and survival of patients free from cerebrovascular events (Log-Rank p=0.186). Furthermore, subgroup analysis for long-term survival in terms of men (Log-Rank p=0.853), women (Log-Rank p=0.227), patients under and above 65 years of age (Log-Rank p=0.188 and Log-Rank p=0.602, respectively) and patients undergoing one of the three types of aortic repair surgery showed similar results for normotensive and hypertensive patient groups. Subgroup analysis for long-term survival of patients free from cerebrovascular events for women, patients under 65 years of age and patients undergoing aortic arch repair showed significant differences between the two groups in favor of hypertensive patients.

Conclusions:

Hypertensive patients suffering from Stanford A AAD were older, more frequently received hemi-arch replacement and were not associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality and poorer long-term survival compared to normotensive patients.

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