Being active or flexible? Role of control coping on quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal cancer


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Abstract

Objectives:This study examined the link between coping and quality of life among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Two hypotheses were tested. The active-personality hypothesis states that quality of life is associated with the predominant use of primary control coping (PCC) in general. The situational-flexibility hypothesis states that quality of life is related to flexible deployment of PCC and secondary control coping (SCC) according to situational controllability.Methods:Participants were 180 Chinese adult patients diagnosed with colon or liver cancer. Their perceived controllability of stressors, coping, and quality of life were compared with those of a sex-and age-matched community sample.Results:Three groups with distinct coping patterns were identified: (a) a flexible group characterized by the use of PCC in controllable situations but SCC in uncontrollable situations, (b) an active group characterized by predominant use of PCC in most situations, and (c) a passive group characterized by predominant use of SCC or avoidant coping in most situations. Patients in the active and the flexible groups had higher perceived controllability and psychological well-being scores than those in the passive group.Conclusions:Our results provide support for both the active-personality and the situational-flexibility hypotheses among GI cancer patients. Clinical and research implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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