Psychosomatic and Psychosocial Symptoms Are Associated with Low Blood Pressure in Swedish Schoolchildren

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Abstract

Background:

The relation between psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms and blood pressure was studied in Swedish schoolchildren.

Methods:

Blood pressure was measured in 122 healthy Swedish schoolchildren, aged 6–16 years. Psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms, delinquent behaviour, parental health and employment status were assessed.

Results:

Children with systolic blood pressure above +1 SD of mean reported significantly less symptoms (JOURNAL/pspsbf/04.02/00006847-199867020-00006/OV0335/v/2017-10-07T104923Z/r/image-png = 1.4) than children with blood pressure below –1 SD of the mean (JOURNAL/pspsbf/04.02/00006847-199867020-00006/OV0335/v/2017-10-07T104923Z/r/image-png = 2.7; p < 0.05). Children with three or more self-reported symptoms had significantly lower blood pressure than children without symptoms both in the supine (110 ± 12 vs. 120 ± 18 mm Hg; p < 0.05) and in the standing position (117 ± 17 vs. 127 ± 18 mm Hg; p < 0.05).

Conclusions:

We conclude that psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms in children might be associated with low blood pressure.

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