Grandmothers as Caregivers: Raising Children of the Crack Cocaine Epidemic

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Abstract

Originally published in Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books, 1994, Vol 39(2), 231. Reviews the book, Grandmothers as Caregivers: Raising Children of the Crack Cocaine Epidemic by Meredith Minkler and Kathleen Roe (1993). Women aged 41 to 79 years voice their feelings and describe their experiences as primary caregivers for their grandchildren (or grandnieces and nephews) whose parents are crack cocaine abusers. The authors interviewed 71 women in Oakland, California, using qualitative and quantitative research methods to discern the plight of grandmother caregiving and its implications for social issues and policy decisions. The authors examine, among other topics, what the grandmothers' lives were like before they became the primary caretakers of these infants, preschoolers, and young children, and how their lives changed as a result, the economic costs of caregiving, special issues in raising children of the crack cocaine epidemic, social networks and support groups, coping strategies, community interventions to support grandparent caregivers, and policy implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved)

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