The Relationship Among Performance of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Self-Report of Quality of Life, and Self-Awareness of Functional Status in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis


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Abstract

Objective:To investigate the relationship between self-awareness of functional status and performance of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), and self-reports of quality of life (QOL) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS).Design:A between-groups design, using a correlational approach to examine the relationship between self-awareness of functional status, IADL and QOL.Participants:We studied 47 individuals with clinically definite MS and 26 healthy controls (HCs).Measures:The Functional Behavior Profile was completed by both participants and their informants. Participants' scores were subtracted from those of their informants', and the absolute value was used as the self-awareness/concordance score. The Executive Function Performance Test measured IADL performance; QOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis.Results:MS participants showed lower levels of self-awareness relative to HCs. Significant correlations were observed between performance of IADL, reports of QOL and self-awareness levels of functional status. However, reports of QOL were not significantly correlated with performance of IADL.Conclusions:The positive association between self-awareness of functional status with IADL performance and QOL reports provides support for the role of awareness in rehabilitation.

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