Substance Use and Treatment Outcomes Among Spanish-Speaking Latino/as From Four Acculturation Types


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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the association of acculturation with substance use treatment outcomes in a sample of treatment-seeking Latino/as (N = 405). The study used data from a multisite randomized controlled trial of a culturally adapted version of Motivational Enhancement Therapy delivered in Spanish. Berry, Kim, Minde, and Mok’s (1987) acculturation model was used to divide the sample into 4 types (integrated, assimilated, separated, marginalized), based on Bicultural Involvement Questionnaire scores. One-way analyses of variance, chi-squared tests, and repeated-measures regression were used to examine baseline acculturation, posttreatment outcomes, and follow-up outcomes. All participants were of Latino/a background, and 88.4% of the sample was male. Participants with greater acculturation to American culture (i.e., integrated and assimilated acculturation types) reported more substance use and associated problems at baseline, χ2(3) = 20.5, p < .001, with the integrated type reporting the highest percentage of substance use disorder symptoms and problems (67.6%). No significant differences in substance use were detected among acculturation types posttreatment or at follow-up. Although the integrated and assimilated acculturation types were associated at baseline with more substance use and associated problems, all acculturation types seemed to benefit at posttreatment from an evidence-based culturally adapted treatment.

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