Additional effects of a cognitive task on dual-task training to reduce dual-task interference


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Abstract

Objective:When we perform dual-tasks in daily life, task performance is generally reduced. As these reductions in performance (i.e., dual-task interference) are responsible for various accidents such as falls, the repeated practice of dual-task (i.e., dual-task training) is often implemented to reduce dual-task interference. However, the risk of various accidents increases with longer dual-task training, as dual-task interference cannot be avoided. Therefore, it is important to achieve training goals more rapidly during dual-task training. This study sought to determine whether a combination of dual-task training and cognitive tasks would accelerate training effects.Design:The experimental design included four groups: 1) cognitive task training group, 2) dual-task training group, 3) cognitive task and dual-task training group, and 4) non training group.Method:We assessed single- and dual-task performance before and after the 2-week training sessions. We adopted a dual-task involving knee extension and an auditory reaction, and used N-back task as a cognitive task. On the other hand, dual-task training was the same method to assess dual-task performance.Result:Dual-task interference was reduced in all groups in both the tasks. However, the number of participants in the cognitive task and dual-task training group who achieved a reduction in dual-task cost was significantly higher than those in other groups.Conclusion:These findings could contribute to the development of an effective method for reducing dual-task interference and resolving issues caused by dual-task interference in daily life.HighlightsWe studied whether dual-task training and cognitive tasks increased training effect.Dual-task interference was reduced in all groups in both tasks.The number of participants in the cognitive task and dual-task training group who reduced dual-task costs was highest.The findings could contribute to effective methods to reduce dual-task interference.

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