AN ATYPICAL CASE OF SYMPATHETIC OPHTHALMIA AFTER LIMBAL CORNEAL LACERATION

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Abstract

Background/Purpose:

To report a case of atypical sympathetic ophthalmia after limbal corneal laceration.

Methods and Results:

An 11-year-old child had a successful left eye corneal laceration repair at the temporal limbus with excision of exposed nonnecrotic iris tissue, resulting in good visual acuity of 20/80 and 20/25 on postoperative Days 1 and 7, respectively. The patient was prescribed 1 mg/kg oral prednisolone in a tapering dose as prophylaxis. On postoperative Day 21, the patient presented with acute onset decreased vision in both eyes. Visual acuity was counting fingers 3 feet in both eyes. On examination, anterior segment examination was quiet without any inflammation, anterior vitreous face showed 1+ cells, and dilated funduscopy revealed bilateral symmetrical serous retinal detachments along the posterior pole. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated separation and elevation of inner neurosensory layers from the outer segment marking presence of hyperreflective material along with subretinal fluid between detached surfaces. There was stippled hyperfluorescence along the posterior pole as seen in fluorescein angiography. With a diagnosis of sympathetic ophthalmia confirmed, oral prednisolone (2 mg/kg body weight) was instituted after which, there was gradual decrease in macular elevation with corresponding improvement in visual acuity with no recurrence for the last 6 months.

Conclusion:

To our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of an atypical presentation of sympathetic ophthalmia, and antecedent corticosteroid therapy would have mitigated robust anterior segment findings usually associated with the condition.

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