Effect of conventional physical therapy and Pilates in functionality, respiratory muscle strength and ability to exercise in hospitalized chronic renal patients: a randomized controlled trial

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Abstract

Objective:

To compare the effect of conventional physical therapy and Pilates on function, restoration, and exercise ability in hospitalized chronic renal patients.

Methods:

A total of 56 inpatients were randomized into two groups: Conventional physical therapy and Pilates. The primary outcomes were functionality (Barthel Index), respiratory muscle strength (manovacuometry), and ability to exercise (step test) evaluated in the following periods: preintervention, after the 5th session, and after the 10th session or at discharge. Three months after randomization, the Barthel Index was applied over the phone. At the end of the 10 sessions or at discharge, the length of hospital stay was calculated and the level of satisfaction with physical therapy care was assessed (MedRisk). Linear mixed models were used for the primary outcomes and the Student’s t-test was used for length of stay and satisfaction.

Results:

There was no significant between-group difference in functionality (MD −1.3; 95% CI −2.8 to 5.4), inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength (MD −1.3; 95% CI −7.3 to 4.5/MD −4.5; 95% CI −0.7 to 9.7, respectively), performance in the step test (MD −3.3; 95% CI −6.2 to 12.8), patient satisfaction with physical therapy care (MD −2.0; 95% CI −5.1 to 9.1), and length of stay (MD 4.5; 95% CI −15.9 to 6.8).

Conclusion:

Both interventions, conventional physical therapy and Pilates, showed improvements and there is no difference between them. Therefore both can be used in chronic renal patients.

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