Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

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Abstract

Non–small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non–small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non–small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle–associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1–mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non–small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non–small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non–small cell lung cancer.

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