It is not just comfort: waterproof casting increases physical functioning in children with minimally angulated distal radius fractures

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Abstract

Waterproof casting has been reported to increase patient comfort and satisfaction, and decrease skin irritation. There are no available data on the influence of waterproof casting materials on physical function in pediatric patients. Our aim was to determine whether the use of waterproof casting would result in faster recovery of physical function while maintaining similar clinical outcomes as those obtained with nonwaterproof materials. Twenty-six children with nonangulated or minimally angulated distal radius fractures were assigned randomly to initially receive a short-arm cast made of one of two optional materials: a hybrid mesh material with a waterproof lining or fiberglass with a nonwaterproof skin protector. Two weeks later, the initial cast was removed and replaced with a short-arm cast made of the alternative option. We compared the rate of fracture displacement, physical function, pain, skin changes, itchiness, and patient satisfaction. No evidence of displacement was found in either group. The mean Activities Scale for Kids – Performance (ASK-P) (physical function) score was 10% higher during the period of time when a waterproof cast was used (P=0.04). When a waterproof cast was used during the first 2 weeks of treatment, the mean total ASK-P scores were 23% higher than that when a nonwaterproof one was used during the same period of time (P=0.003). Patients who received a waterproof cast as the initial treatment reported lower functional scores overall and in almost every domain of the ASK-P once they were in a nonwaterproof one; similarly, those who received a nonwaterproof cast as the initial treatment reported higher functional scores overall and in every domain of the ASK-P once they were in a waterproof cast. Compared with a nonwaterproof cast, the use of waterproof casting resulted in comparable levels of pain, itchiness, skin irritability, and overall patient satisfaction. The results of this randomized, cross-over trial suggest that the use of waterproof casting material for the treatment of nondisplaced or minimally displaced distal radius fractures in children can result in a faster recovery of physical function, while providing comparable stability, pain, itchiness, skin irritability, and overall patient satisfaction. Level of Evidence: II.

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