The Effectiveness and Long-Term Outcome of Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy With Frosted Jones Tubes

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Abstract

Purpose:

To describe success rates and long-term outcomes of conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) with frosted Jones tubes (FJT) for epiphora with proximal outflow obstruction.

Methods:

A retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing external and endoscopic CDCR with FJTs by one author (RAD) was performed between January 1, 2006 and November 1, 2014 at the Casey Eye Institute. Patient demographics, etiology of tearing, concurrent endonasal and eyelid procedures, and FJT size were recorded. After CDCR, follow-up time, tube size changes, tube position, and tearing status were noted. Exclusion criteria included follow up less than 6 months and/or prior CDCR. The study was IRB approved, HIPAA compliant, and adherent to the declaration of Helsinki.

Results:

Forty-two eyes of 31 patients met the inclusion criteria, with the majority having epiphora from canalicular obstruction (31%) or flaccid canaliculi (31%). Average follow up was 1,088 days. Forty of 42 eyes, or 30 of 31 patients, had complete resolution of tearing after surgery. Twenty of 42 eyes required tube size changes, usually an increase in collar size (45%) and/or decrease in tube length (55%). Six of 42 FJTs were lost, one migrating outward, with an average time to loss between 61 and 1,122 days (mean 817 days). After collars larger than 4 mm became available, only one tube was lost. All epiphora resolved after repeat CDCR. The most common complication was intermittent irritation (17%) near the FJT that resolved after antibiotic–steroid drops and/or tube replacement/cleaning.

Conclusion:

CDCR with FJTs is highly effective in correcting epiphora, and well tolerated by the majority.

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