Long-Term Outcomes After ICU Admission Triage in Octogenarians

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Abstract

Objective:

To describe ICU admission triage and outcomes in octogenarians.

Design:

Multicenter prospective observational study.

Setting:

Three nonuniversity hospitals and three university hospitals in Norway.

Patients:

Patients 80 years old or older who were referred for ICU admission from November 2013 to October 2014.

Interventions:

None.

Measurements and Main Results:

Of the 355 included patients, 105 (29.6%) were refused ICU treatment. Risk factors for ICU refusal in patients considered “too ill/old” were advanced age and low functional status. Risk factors for ICU refusal in patients considered “too well” were advanced age, male sex, university hospital admission, comorbidity, and low Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3. Overall ICU survival was 71.6%. Hospital and 1-year survival were 56.0% and 40.0% in the ICU-admitted, 65.2% and 50.0% in the nonadmitted patients considered too well, and 32.7% and 11.5% in patients considered too ill/old, respectively. The adjusted Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly lower survival for nonadmitted patients considered too ill/old than for ICU-admitted patients and nonadmitted patients considered too well. At follow-up, triage patients had lower health-related quality of life than an age- and sex-matched control group in the domains of self-care, usual care, and anxiety and depression, and a lower EuroQol visual analog scale scores.

Conclusions:

Overall, 29.6% of the patients were refused ICU treatment. The adjusted survival analyses showed a significantly higher survival for ICU-admitted octogenarians than for nonadmitted patients who were considered too ill/old, indicating a benefit of ICU admission. Overall, the follow-up of triage patients showed lower health-related quality of life than an age- and sex-matched control population.

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