First case of neonatal diabetes with KCNJ11 Q52R mutation successfully switched from insulin to sulphonylurea treatment

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Abstract

In this report, we present the first known case of intermediate developmental delay, epilepsy and permanent neonatal diabetes (DEND) syndrome caused by a Q52R mutation in the KCNJ11 gene who was successfully switched (at age 1.3 years) to sulphonylurea monotherapy, namely glibenclamide. The most recent evaluation, after 2 years, showed a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.0% (42 mmol/mol). This mutation is so severe that none of the previously reported four cases were able to switch from insulin to sulphonylurea monotherapy. The Q52R mutation seems to have a chance of positive response to glibenclamide administered every 3–6 h instead of the classical 8–12 h, in doses around or above 2.5 mg/kg/day.

DEND syndrome represents the association of developmental delay, epilepsy and permanent neonatal diabetes. The Q52R mutation seems to have a chance of positive response to glibenclamide administered every 3–6 h instead of the classical 8–12 h, in doses around or above 2.5 mg/kg/day.

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