Effects of an adapted cardiac rehabilitation programme on arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes without cardiac disease diagnosis

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Purpose:

To determine the effects of a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of aerobic and resistance exercise training on arterial stiffness, peak calf vasodilatory reserve, and haemostatic markers in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Methods:

Observational cohort study examining effects of 12 weeks of exercise training in 23 subjects (13 men, 10 women; mean age of 56.1 ± 10.1 years) with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects performed exercise training for 12 weeks [aerobic training 5 days/week, 70%–75% peak cardiovascular fitness (VO2peak) and resistance training 2–3 days/week, 60% of one repetition maximum]. Vascular stiffness (pulse-wave velocity), augmentation index, peak calf vasodilatory reserve, and VO2peak were measured pre- and post-exercise training. Secondary outcomes included heart rate variability and haemostatic measures.

Results:

VO2peak increased by 16% (20.1 ± 5.5 vs 23.2 ± 8.8 mL/kg/min, p = 0.002) and abdominal circumference was reduced (101.9 ± 13.3 vs 97.9 ± 12.7 cm, p < 0.03). Vascular function was improved including central arterial stiffness (central pulse-wave velocity: 8.44 ± 1.75 vs 8.02 ± 1.60 m/s, p = 0.026) and the aortic augmentation index (21.7 ± 10.6% vs 18.3 ± 12.6%, p = 0.005); peak calf vasodilatory reserve increased from 30.3 ± 10.6 mL/100 mL/min to 38.0 ± 15.3 mL/100 mL/min (p = 0.04). No changes were seen in heart rate variability, blood lipids, glycated haemoglobin and C-reactive protein.

Conclusion:

A 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of aerobic and resistance training significantly reduces arterial stiffness and improves aerobic fitness in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles