A Mixed-Methods Analysis of a Novel Mistreatment Program for the Surgery Core Clerkship

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Abstract

Purpose

To review mistreatment reports from before and after implementation of a mistreatment program, and student ratings of and qualitative responses to the program to evaluate the short-term impact on students.

Method

In January 2014, a video- and discussion-based mistreatment program was implemented for the surgery clerkship at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The program aims to help students establish expectations for the learning environment; create a shared and personal definition of mistreatment; and promote advocacy and empower ment to address mistreatment. Counts and types of mistreatment were compared from a year before (January–December 2013) and two years after (January 2014–December 2015) implementation. Students’ end-of-clerkship ratings and responses to open-ended questions were analyzed.

Results

From March 2014–December 2015, 141/164 (86%) students completed ratings, and all 47 (100%) students enrolled from January–August 2014 provided qualitative program evaluations. Most students rated the initial (108/141 [77%]) and final (120/141 [85%]) sessions as excellent or outstanding. In the qualitative analysis, students valued that the program helped establish expectations; allowed for sharing experiences; provided formal resources; and provided a supportive environment. Students felt the learning environment and culture were improved and reported increased interest in surgery. There were 14 mistreatment reports the year before the program, 9 in the program’s first year, and 4 in the second year.

Conclusions

The authors found a rotation-specific mistreatment program, focused on creating shared understanding about mistreatment, was well received among surgery clerkship students, and the number of mistreatment reports decreased each year following implementation.

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