Aortic arch reconstruction: deep and moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion

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Abstract

Objective:

To compare the effects of moderate and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) during aortic arch surgery in adult patients and to offer the evidence for the detection of the temperature which provides best brain protection in the subjects who accept aortic arch reconstruction surgery.

Methods:

A total of 109 patients undergoing surgery of the aortic arch were divided into the moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest group (Group I) and the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest group (Group II). We recorded the data of the patients and their cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, aortic clamping time, SACP time and postoperative anesthetized recovery time, tracheal intubation time, time in the intensive care unit (ICU) and postoperative neurologic dysfunction.

Results:

Patient characteristics were similar in the two groups. There were four patients who died in Group II and 1 patient in Group I. There were no significant differences in aortic clamping time of each group (111.4±58.4 vs. 115.9±16.2) min; SACP time (27.4±5.9 vs. 23.5±6.1) min of the moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest group and the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest group; there were significant differences in cardiopulmonary bypass time (207.4±20.9 vs. 263.8±22.6) min, postoperative anesthetized recovery time (19.0±11.1 vs. 36.8±25.3) hours, extubation time (46.4±15.1 vs. 64.4±6.0) hours; length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) (4.7±1.7 vs. 8±2.3) days and postoperative neurologic dysfunction in the two groups.

Conclusion:

Compared to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest can provide better brain protection and achieve good clinical results.

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