Medication Update

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Excerpt

The FDA approved two new combination treatments for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM): Sanofi's once-daily Soliqua 100/33 (insulin glargine 100 units/mL and lixisenatide 33 mcg/mL injection) and Novo Nordisk's Xultophy 100/3.6 (insulin degludec 100 units/mL and liraglutide 3.6 mg/mL injection). Both drugs contain fixed doses of a long-acting insulin and a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist.
Soliqua 100/33 is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with T2DM who are inadequately controlled on basal insulin or lixisenatide. Soliqua 100/33 is delivered as a subcutaneous injection in a single, prefilled pen for once-daily dosing.
Soliqua 100/33 has not been studied with short-acting insulin or in patients with a history of pancreatitis. The drug should be stopped if pancreatitis is suspected and should not be restarted if pancreatitis is confirmed. It is not known if it is safe and effective in children under age 18. The drug is not for use in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), diabetic ketoacidosis, or for those who have gastroparesis.
Xultophy 100/3.6 is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with T2DM who are inadequately controlled on basal insulin or liraglutide. Xultophy 100/3.6 is taken once daily at the same time each day as a subcutaneous injection with or without food and is available in a prefilled pen. The drug is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma or if the patient has multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2. It is not known if the medication is safe and effective for use in children under age 18.
Xultophy 100/3.6 is not recommended for patients with a history of pancreatitis. The drug should be stopped if pancreatitis is suspected and should not be restarted if pancreatitis is confirmed. Xultophy 100/3.6 is not recommended for use in patients with T1DM or ketoacidosis.
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