Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients with Lung Cancer Harboring Multiple Molecular Alterations: Results from the IFCT Study Biomarkers France

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Abstract

Introduction:

Little is known about the prevalence, prognosis, and response to treatment of advanced NSCLC harboring multiple genomic alterations.

Methods:

The French Biomarkers France database, which includes 17,664 patients, was used. The prevalence of multiple alterations, their associations, their impact on prognosis (overall survival [OS]), and their response to targeted or conventional treatments (progression-free survival [PFS] and objective response rate) were assessed and compared with those of patients harboring single or no mutation.

Results:

We identified 162 patients (0.9%) with double alterations and three with triple mutations. Multiple molecular alterations preferentially involved KRAS (67.3%), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha gene (PIK3CA) (53.3%), and EGFR (42.4%). Patients with multiple alterations were more likely to be male (56.4%), be never-smokers (25.8 versus 34.7%, p < 0.001), and exhibit adenocarcinomas (83.6%). OS did not differ between single and multiple alterations. Patients with EGFR/KRAS and EGFR/PIK3CA mutations experienced worse PFS than did patients with only EGFR mutations (7.1 and 7.1 versus 14.9 months, p = 0.02 and 0.002, respectively). Concomitant mutations in patients harboring anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK) rearrangement bore little impact on OS (17.7 versus 20.3 months, p = 0.57) or PFS (10.3 versus 12.1 months, p = 0.93). Patients harboring KRAS mutations plus another alteration had an OS time (13.4 versus 11.2 months, p = 0.28), PFS time (6.4 versus 7.2 months, p = 0.78), and objective response rate under first-line chemotherapy (41.7% versus 37.2%) similar to those of patients harboring KRAS mutations only.

Conclusions:

With almost 1% of patients harboring multiple alterations, the dogma of mutually exclusive mutations should be reconsidered. Although double mutations do not decrease OS, they do alter PFS under first-line treatment for patients with EGFR mutations. Among limited numbers of patients, therapies targeting the dominant oncogene seem to usually remain active.

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