Medical and psychosocial factors and unfavourable low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control in coronary patients

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Abstract

Objective

Understanding the determinants of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) control constitutes the basis of modelling interventions for optimal lipid control and prognosis. We aim to identify medical and psychosocial (study) factors associated with unfavourable LDL-C control in coronary patients.

Methods

A cross-sectional explorative study used logistic and linear regression analysis to investigate the association between study factors and LDL-C in 1095 patients, hospitalized with myocardial infarction and/or a coronary revascularization procedure. Data were collected from hospital records, a comprehensive self-report questionnaire, clinical examination and blood samples after 2–36 months follow-up.

Results

Fifty-seven per cent did not reach the LDL-C target of 1.8 mmol/l at follow-up. Low socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors were not associated with failure to reach the LDL-C target. Statin specific side-effects (odds ratio 3.23), low statin adherence (odds ratio 3.07), coronary artery by-pass graft operation as index treatment (odds ratio 1.95), ≥ 1 coronary event prior to the index event (odds ratio 1.81), female gender (odds ratio 1.80), moderate- or low-intensity statin therapy (odds ratio 1.62) and eating fish < 3 times/week (odds ratio 1.56) were statistically significantly associated with failure to reach the LDL-C target, in adjusted analyses. Only side-effects (standardized β 0.180), low statin adherence (β 0.209) and moderate- or low-intensity statin therapy (β 0.228) were associated with LDL-C in continuous analyses.

Conclusions

Statin specific side-effects, low statin adherence and moderate- or low-intensity statin therapy were the major factors associated with unfavourable LDL-C control. Interventions to improve LDL-C should ensure adherence and prescription of sufficiently potent statins, and address side-effects appropriately.

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