Spreading depolarization monitoring in neurocritical care of acute brain injury

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Abstract

Purpose of review

Spreading depolarizations are unique in being discrete pathologic entities that are well characterized experimentally and also occur commonly in patients with substantial acute brain injury. Here, we review essential concepts in depolarization monitoring, highlighting its clinical significance, interpretation, and future potential.

Recent findings

Cortical lesion development in diverse animal models is mediated by tissue waves of mass spreading depolarization that cause the toxic loss of ion homeostasis and limit energy substrate supply through associated vasoconstriction. The signatures of such deterioration are observed in electrocorticographic recordings from perilesional cortex of patients with acute stroke or brain trauma. Experimental work suggests that depolarizations are triggered by energy supply–demand mismatch in focal hotspots of the injury penumbra, and depolarizations are usually observed clinically when other monitoring variables are within recommended ranges. These results suggest that depolarizations are a sensitive measure of relative ischemia and ongoing secondary injury, and may serve as a clinical guide for personalized, mechanistically targeted therapy. Both existing and future candidate therapies offer hope to limit depolarization recurrence.

Summary

Electrocorticographic monitoring of spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury provides a sensitive measure of relative energy shortage in focal, vulnerable brains regions and indicates ongoing secondary damage. Depolarization monitoring holds potential for targeted clinical trial design and implementation of precision medicine approaches to acute brain injury therapy.

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