Lung Function in South African Adolescents Infected Perinatally with HIV and Treated Long-Term with Antiretroviral Therapy

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Rationale:

Lung disease is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in HIV-infected adolescents, but there is limited information on the spectrum of lung function impairment in adolescents on antiretroviral therapy.

Objectives:

To investigate lung function in HIV-infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in the Cape Town Adolescent Antiretroviral Cohort (Cape Town, South Africa).

Methods:

A total of 515 South African adolescents, aged 9-14 years, stable on antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months, underwent baseline lung function testing. Measures included spirometry, nitrogen multiple-breath washout, forced oscillation technique, 6-minute walk test, single-breath carbon monoxide diffusion testing, and bronchodilator response testing. A comparator group of 110 age- and ethnicity-matched HIV-uninfected adolescents was also tested.

Results:

For the HIV-infected adolescents (mean [SD] age 12 [1.6] years, 52% male), the median (interquartile range) duration of antiretroviral therapy was 7.6 (4.6-9.2) years. The median (interquartile range) nadir CD4 was 510.5 (274-903) cells/mm3. HIV-infected adolescents had significantly lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide, respiratory system compliance, and functional residual capacity than HIV-uninfected adolescents (P < 0.05 for all associations). HIV-infected adolescents had higher airway resistance and lung clearance index than HIV-uninfected adolescents (P < 0.05 for all associations). Although generally small in magnitude, these differences remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, and height. In addition, age, sex, height, and history of past lower respiratory tract infection or pulmonary tuberculosis were associated with reduced lung function.

Conclusions:

Perinatally infected South African HIV-infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy have lower lung function than uninfected adolescents. Prior lower respiratory tract infection or pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with lower lung function.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles