Middle Ear Obliteration with Blind-Sac Closure of the External Auditory Canal for Spontaneous CSF Otorrhea

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Abstract

Outcome Objectives

To (1) identify unique features of patients who underwent middle ear/mastoid obliteration with blind-sac closure of the external auditory canal for spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea and (2) explore outcomes.

Study Design

Case series with chart review.

Setting

Tertiary care center.

Subjects and Methods

Adults treated for spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea from 2007 through 2015 were reviewed and stratified into 2 groups based on the surgery performed: (1) 11 patients underwent middle ear/mastoid obliteration with blind-sac closure of the external auditory canal and (2) 26 patients underwent other procedures. Demographics, body mass index, revised cardiac risk index, Duke Activity Status Index scores, and anticoagulation use were documented. Audiologic data were gathered from pre- and postoperative visits. The primary outcome measure was leak recurrence. Complications were tabulated.

Results

Poor preoperative hearing was a relative indication for obliteration. Obliteration patients had higher body mass index (43.2 vs 34.9 kg/m2; P < .05), incidence of super-morbid obesity (45% vs 7.6%; P = .015), anticoagulation usage (36% vs 0%; P = .004), cardiac risk scores (1.2 vs 0.1 dB; P < .0004), and Duke Activity Status Index scores. There was 1 leak recurrence (9%). Major and minor complication rates were 9% and 36%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 30.8 ± 8.6 months.

Conclusion

Middle ear and mastoid obliteration with blind-sac closure of the external auditory canal is effective for treating spontaneous CSF otorrhea. The small cohort reviewed did not experience any major perioperative morbidity. The technique may be best suited for patients with poor hearing, the infirm, and those in whom craniotomy is contraindicated.

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