Association between daily walking and antioxidant capacity in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease

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Abstract

Objective:

The primary aim of the study was to assess whether both the amount and pace of daily walking were associated with circulating antioxidant capacity in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Methods:

Community-based walking was measured in 244 men and women who were limited by symptomatic PAD during a 1-week period in which they wore an ankle-mounted step activity monitor. Patients were further characterized by circulating antioxidant capacity with the OxiSelect (Cell Biolabs Inc, San Diego, Calif) hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity (HORAC) activity assay.

Results:

To assess the amount of walking, patients were grouped into low (≤2440 strides/d), middle (2441-3835 strides/d), and high (>3835 strides/d) stride tertiles. HORAC was higher in the middle (P = .03) and high (P = .01) stride tertiles than in the low tertile, but there was no difference between middle and high tertiles (P = .44). To assess the pace of walking, patients were grouped into slow (<25.0 strides/min), middle (25.0-31.6 strides/min), and fast (>31.6 strides/min) cadence tertiles. HORAC was higher in the high cadence tertile than in the low (P < .01) and middle (P < .01) tertiles, but there was no difference between low and middle tertiles (P = .48). Similar findings were obtained on group differences in HORAC after adjusting for age, sex, race, and ankle-brachial index for both the amount and pace of daily walking.

Conclusions:

Walking >2440 strides each day and walking at a cadence faster than 31.6 strides/min for 30 minutes each day are both associated with greater circulating antioxidant capacity in symptomatic patients with PAD. The clinical significance is that a home-based walking program may be one approach to increase endogenous antioxidant capacity.

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