PROPHYLACTIC PERIPHERAL LASER AND FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY AFTER BEVACIZUMAB FOR RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY

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Abstract

Purpose:

To report reactivation rate after bevacizumab treatment for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in eyes with classic ROP (CROP) versus aggressive posterior ROP (APROP) and to report peripheral fluorescein angiography findings in these eyes.

Methods:

Retrospective chart review was conducted on consecutive infants treated with bevacizumab for ROP, followed by fluorescein angiography and prophylactic laser to persistent avascular retina.

Results:

Sixty-four eyes of 33 patients were included. Mean gestational age was 25 weeks with mean birth weight of 674 g. Mean follow-up was 125 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA). Reactivation requiring treatment after initial bevacizumab was more common in eyes with APROP (8/16) than with CROP (2/48; P < 0.0001). At mean 73 weeks PMA, eyes with APROP had more avascular retina (mean 4.4 disk diameters vs. 2.6 disk diameters; P = 0.0004) and higher percentage of leakage (11/11 eyes vs. 22/38 eyes; P = 0.01) on fluorescein angiography than in eyes with CROP. Unfavorable outcome occurred in 1 of 16 eyes with APROP and in no eyes with CROP. No eye that underwent prophylactic laser after bevacizumab had a poor structural outcome.

Conclusion:

In our study, bevacizumab-treated eyes with APROP have a higher likelihood of recurrence and larger area of persistent nonperfusion than in eyes with CROP. Treatment of ROP with bevacizumab followed by prophylactic laser has a low rate of unfavorable structural outcome.

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