Relationship between clinical outcomes and vessel size in endovascular therapy for femoropopliteal lesions

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Abstract

Objective:

We investigated the relationship between the outcomes of endovascular therapy (EVT) for femoropopliteal (FP) lesions and vessel diameter. Several studies have reported a relationship between the outcome of EVT for FP lesions and lesion characteristics. However, the relationship with vessel diameter has not been explored.

Methods:

We retrospectively analyzed 2656 patients with 3340 de novo FP lesions (mean age, 73.9 ± 9 years; 70% male) who underwent EVT from January 2004 to December 2011. We classified the lesions into four groups according to the vessel diameter: group 1, ≤4 mm; group 2, 4 to 5 mm; group 3, 5 to 6 mm; and group 4, >6 mm. We investigated the relationship between the outcomes of EVT and vessel diameter. The primary outcome measure was restenosis, and the secondary outcome measures were target lesion revascularization and major adverse limb events.

Results:

The restenosis rate at 3 years in group 1 was significantly higher compared with the other groups (62.2%, 35.7%, 37.1%, and 41.0% for groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively; log-rank, P < .0001). The outcome among small vessels was significantly worse in the stent group, and the outcomes for target lesion revascularization and major adverse limb events were similar. After adjustment, a small vessel ≤4 mm remained an independent predictor of restenosis (hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-1.98; P < .0001).

Conclusions:

This study suggested that vessel diameter, especially a small vessel ≤4 mm, was associated with poor EVT outcomes. The tendency was particularly evident in the stent group, which suggested that primary stenting should not necessarily be recommended for small vessels.

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