Pediatric Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in the United States.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about the epidemiology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in children.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to determine the morbidity, mortality, and comorbid health conditions of SJS and TEN in US children.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study of the 2009 to 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, which contains a representative 20% sample of all US hospitalizations. Sociodemographics, inflation-adjusted cost, length of stay, comorbidities, and mortality were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses.

RESULTS

The incidences of SJS, SJS-TEN, and TEN were a mean 5.3, 0.8, and 0.4 cases per million children per year in the US, respectively. Prolonged length of stay and higher costs of care (SJS: 9.4 ± 0.6 days, $24,947 ± $3171; SJS-TEN: 15.7 ± 1.5 days, $63,787 ± $8014; TEN: 20.4 ± 6.3 days, $102,243 ± $37,588) were observed compared with all other admissions (4.6 ± 0.1 days, $10,496 ± $424). Mortality was 0% for SJS, 4% for SJS-TEN, and 16% for TEN. In regression models, predictors of mortality included renal failure (adjusted OR [aOR] 300.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 48.59->999.99), malignancy (aOR 54.33, 95% CI 9.40-314.22), septicemia (aOR 30.45, 95% CI 7.91-117.19), bacterial infection (aOR 20.38, 95% CI 5.44-76.36), and epilepsy (aOR 5.56, 95% CI 1.37-26.2).

LIMITATIONS

Data regarding treatment were not available. Date of diagnosis of comorbidities was not present, precluding temporal analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

Pediatric SJS/TEN poses a substantial health burden in the United States.

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