Anterior Trunk Mobility Does Not Predict Disability in Elderly Women With Acute Low Back Pain: Brazilian Back Complaints in the Elders (BACE-Brazil) Study Results

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Abstract

Study Design.

Cross-sectional, ancillary study of an international multicenter epidemiological study.

Objective.

To investigate the relationship of the anterior trunk mobility with self-report and physical performance measures in elderly women with acute low back pain (LBP).

Summary of Background Data.

LBP is one of the most prevalent pain complaints in the elderly population. It is postulated that the increased range of motion of limited joints of the trunk may improve LBP and functionality of patients. Recent studies have, however, questioned the association between trunk range of motion and the functional status.

Methods.

The present study included a convenience sample of elderly women from the community aged 60 years and older who presented with a new (acute) episode of LBP. Volunteers with severe diseases and visual, hearing and mobility losses, or cognitive impairment were excluded. Trunk mobility was assessed by the fingertip-to-floor test. Functionality was assessed by the Roland-Morris Questionnaire (RMQ) and gait speed test. Statistical analysis was performed by using hierarchical linear regression model.

Results.

Data from 459 elderly women, mean age of 69.0 (6.1) years old, were used to describe this report. The additional predictive value for the inclusion of independent variable trunk mobility was only 4.4% in the RMQ score and 1.5% in the gait speed test, respectively. A reduced hierarchical linear regression model showed that the significant predictors for RMQ and gait speed test were body mass index, pain intensity, and trunk mobility.

Conclusion.

This was the first study to investigate the relationship between trunk mobility and functionality in elderly women with acute LBP. The results suggest that these clinical parameters are independent from each other.

Conclusion.

Level of Evidence: N/A

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