Parkinson disease and musculoskeletal pain: an 8-year population-based cohort study

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and clinical features of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) compared with a control group without the disease. The retrospective cohort study used a subset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) comprising information on 1 million beneficiaries randomly sampled from the entire population of Taiwan. A total of 490 patients aged 50 and above with newly diagnosed Parkinson disease were identified during a period from 2000 to 2005. Among them, 199 developed MSP after PD. The control group consisted of 1960 participants without PD over the study period randomly selected by matching PD cases according to the date of PD incidence, age, and sex. The study groups were then followed to the end of 2007. Musculoskeletal pain was the end point. The incidence rate ratios of MSP were higher in the PD group than in the control group, representing an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.58). PD was associated with a significantly elevated risk of MSP in all sex and age stratifications, with the highest hazard ratio noted for middle-aged male patients with PD, followed by older male patients with PD. This study showed that the PD may significantly increase the risk of developing MSP. The risk of developing MSP seems to be greatest for middle-aged male patients with PD. Clinicians should be more alert for MSP in patients with PD, and early intervention should be considered.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles