Relationship between anesthesia and postoperative endophthalmitis: A retrospective study

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Abstract

Previous study showed that patients under general anesthesia (GA) had nasopharyngeal secretions on the face at the end of ocular surgery, especially in propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), it might induce postoperative endophthalmitis. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to compare the incidence of endophthalmitis after ocular surgery under topical, inhalation anesthesia, and propofol-based TIVA in our medical center from 2011 to 2015.

A total of 21,032 patients were included, and we evaluated epidemiologic factors, systemic diseases, other ocular pathologic characteristics, complications during the surgery, technique of ocular surgery, method of antibiotic prophylaxis, vitreous culture, and vision outcome in these patients.

Fifteen endophthalmitis cases among 21,032 operations reported, equaling an incidence of 0.071%. The incidence rates under topical, inhalation anesthesia, and propofol-based TIVA were 0.083%, 0.039%, and 0%, respectively (P = 0.39). Moreover, the risk of endophthalmitis under GA (0.024%) was significantly lower than topical anesthesia (0.083%) (P < 0.001). We also found that elder was the risk factor for endophthalmitis following ocular surgery.

In conclusion, propofol-based TIVA or inhalation anesthesia did not increase the risk of endophthalmitis after ocular surgery. Thus, GA was not a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. By contrast, elder was the risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis.

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