Interactions of full-fat canola seed, oat hulls as an insoluble fiber source and pellet temperature for nutrient utilization and growth performance of broiler chickens

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Abstract

The effectiveness of the addition of oat hulls (OH) as an insoluble fiber for improving nutrient digestibility and performance of birds fed diets containing full-fat canola seed (CS) was studied. A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used to assess the main effects of canola source (CS vs canola meal plus oil as control), OH (0 or 3%), pellet temperature (75 and 90°C) and their interactions. A total of 576 male day-old Ross 308 chickens were assigned to 8 experimental treatments, each replicated 6 times (12 birds per replicate). All birds were fed a same commercial starter diet for the first 10 d of age. Canola meal and canola oil in the control diets were replaced with CS at 11.6% and 13.5% in the grower (d 10 to 24) and finisher (d 24 to 35) diets, respectively. An interaction was observed between canola source and OH led to improved body weight gain (P < 0.01) and FCR (P < 0.05) in birds fed the combination of CS and OH in grower phase. Pelleting temperature at 75 vs 90°C did not affect performance of broilers. Birds fed diets containing OH had heavier gizzards at 24 and 35 d of age. Inclusion of CS in the diets depressed fat digestibility at d 24 (P < 0.001) and AME of the grower diets. At d 35, there was a significant interaction (P < 0.05) between CS and pellet temperature where birds fed CS diets pelleted at 75°C had higher fat digestibility than birds fed CS pelleted at 90°C. Regardless of canola source or pellet temperature, OH increased fat utilization at d 35 (P < 0.001) but had no effect on AME of the grower diets. In conclusion, CS can replace supplemental oil in broiler diets when an adequate source of insoluble fiber is included in the diet, which may help to maintain feed intake of broilers fed CS in steam-pelleted diets.

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