Symptomatic Delayed Aortic Dissection After Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenting for Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia

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Abstract

Chronic mesenteric ischemia most commonly occurs secondary to atherosclerotic disease of the mesenteric arteries. Patients are often older than 60 years and can present with postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, and significant weight loss. Symptomatic disease has traditionally been managed with open surgical repair, but endovascular strategies, such as percutaneous angioplasty and stenting, have emerged as the mainstays of therapy. Complications from stenting include plaque embolization, thrombosis, perforation, or dissection of the mesenteric arteries. We present a patient with symptomatic acute aortic dissection 18 months after celiac and superior mesenteric artery stent placement for chronic mesenteric ischemia.

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