Development and Validation of the Narrative Quality Assessment Tool

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Abstract

Background and Purpose:

The use of storytelling in health promotion has grown over the past 2 decades, showing promise for moving people to initiate healthy behavior change. Given the increasingly prevalent role of storytelling in health promotion research and the need to more clearly identify what storytelling elements and mediators may better predict behavior change, there is a need to develop measures to specifically assess these factors in a cultural community context. The purpose of this study is to develop and preliminarily validate a narrative quality assessment tool for measuring elements of storytelling that are predicted to affect attitude and behavior change (i.e., narrative characteristics, identification, and transportation) within a cultural community setting using a culture-centric model.

Methods:

Reliability and validity of these scales were assessed with repeated administrations among 74 Latino men and women with a mean age of 39.6 years (SD = 11.47 years).

Results:

The confirmatory factor analysis in addition to internal consistency tests revealed preliminary evidence for reliability and validity of the narrative characteristics, identification, and transportation scales. Cronbach's alpha ranged from .92 to .94. Items revealed adequate factor loadings (.85-.98) and good model fit.

Conclusion:

The new scales provide the first step in moving the assessment of narrative quality into a culturally relevant context for evaluation of story use in health promotion. The results present valuable information for nurse researchers to guide the development and testing of culturally grounded storytelling interventions’ potential to predict attitude and behavior change for patients.

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