Repurposing bacterial toxins for intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Despite enormous efforts, achieving efficacious levels of proteins inside mammalian cells remains one of the greatest challenges in biologics-based drug discovery and development. The inability of proteins to readily cross biological membranes precludes access to the wealth of intracellular targets and applications that lie within mammalian cells. Existing methods of delivery commonly suffer from an inability to target specific cells and tissues, poor endosomal escape, and limited in vivo efficacy. The aim of the present commentary is to highlight the potential of certain classes of bacterial toxins, which naturally deliver a large protein into the cytosolic compartment of target cells after binding a host cell-surface receptor with high affinity, as robust protein delivery platforms. We review the progress made in recent years toward demonstrating the utility of these systems at delivering a wide variety of protein cargo, with special attention paid to three distinct toxin-based platforms. We contend that with recent advances in protein deimmunization strategies, bacterial toxins are poised to introduce biologics into the inner sanctum of cells and treat a wealth of heretofore untreatable diseases with a new generation of therapeutics.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles