Patient-reported Quality of Life After Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer: The Effect of Prostate Size

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Abstract

Micro-Abstract

The present study assessed the effect of prostate gland size on patient-assessed quality of life (QOL) after definitive treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma with proton beam therapy. A larger prostate size, despite receiving a greater radiation dose, did not affect QOL at 6 months, providing further support that neoadjuvant cytoreductive treatments are unnecessary.

Background:

In the present study, we assessed the effect of prostate gland size on patient-assessed genitourinary and gastrointestinal (GI) quality of life (QOL) after definitive treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma with proton beam therapy.

Patients and Methods:

As a part of a prospective outcome tracking protocol, 81 patients treated at a single center between with proton beam therapy completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire before treatment and at the follow-up examinations. We reviewed the dosimetric data, reported as Vx (volume of organ receiving x Gy), and patient-reported QOL at 6 months. Genitourinary QOL was assessed using the American Urological Association symptom score and EPIC urinary domain score. GI QOL was assessed using the EPIC GI domain score.

Results:

Larger prostate glands were associated with greater bladder V70 (P < .01) and rectal V70 (P < .01). The rectal V70 was < 15% for all patients (range, 4%-13.8%) with the planned treatment volume coverage (percentage of the prescription dose covering 95% of the volume > 95%) maintained. Patients with larger prostates did not have a greater change in their American Urological Association symptom index scores (< 30 cm3, +2.3; 30-49 cm3, +3.2; ≥ 50 cm3, 0.2; P = .06) or urinary domain score (< 30 cm3, −3.6; 30-49 cm3, −3.1; ≥ 50 cm3, +3.8; P = .76) at 6 months after treatment. Also, prostate size was not associated with a change in the EPIC GI domain score at 6 months after treatment (< 30 cm3, −3.7; 30-49 cm3, −1.1; ≥ 50 cm3, −0.55; P = .67).

Conclusion:

Definitive proton beam therapy for prostate cancer to a dose of 79.2 Gy resulted in excellent patient-reported urinary and GI QOL, independently of the baseline prostate size. This single-institution finding should be tested further in a multi-institutional study to confirm the potential limited role of androgen deprivation therapy.

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