Long-term Impact of Bile Duct Injury on Morbidity, Mortality, Quality of Life, and Work Related Limitations

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Abstract

Objective:

Assessment of long-term comprehensive outcome of multimodality treatment of bile duct injury (BDI) in terms of morbidity, mortality, quality of life (QoL), survival, and work related limitations.

Background:

The impact of BDI on work ability is scarcely investigated.

Methods:

BDI patients referred to a tertiary center after BDI were included (n = 800). QoL and work related limitations (HLQ) were compared with 175 control patients after uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Results:

The mean survival after BDI was 17.6 years (95% confidence interval, CI, 17.2–18.0 years). BDI related mortality was 3.5% (28/800). Corrected for sex, ASA classification, treatment and type of injury, survival is worse in male patients (hazard ratio, HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.01–2.33) and progressively worse with higher ASA classification (ASA2: 5.25 (2.94–9.37), ASA3: 18.1 (9.79–33.3). Patients treated surgically had a significantly better survival (HR: 0.45 (95% CI: 0.25–0.80). BDI patients reported a significantly worse physical QoL compared with the control group and worse disease specific QoL. Loss of productivity of work was significantly higher among BDI patients. There also was a significant hindrance in unpaid work. A higher number of bile duct injury patients were receiving disability benefits after long-term follow-up (34.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.004).

Conclusions:

Reconstructive surgery in BDI patients is associated with improved survival. Although the clinical outcome of multidisciplinary treatment of bile duct injury is good, it is associated with a significant decrease in QoL, loss of productivity in both paid and unpaid work and high rates of disability benefits use.

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